Login

Use the Login authentication to send a one-time login request to obtain temporary credentials for authentication of all the other API requests.

A sample Login authentication looks like this:

{
    "api": {
        ...,
        "authentication": {
            "type": "login",
            "loginRequest": {
                "endpoint": "login",
                "method": "GET",
                "headers": {
                    "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                    "X-Password": "TopSecret"
                }
            },
            "format": "json",
            "apiRequest": {
                "headers": {
                    "X-ApiToken": {
                        "response": "authorization.token"
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    },
    "config": {
        ...
    }
}

Configuration Parameters

The following configuration parameters are supported for the login type of authentication:

  • loginRequest (required, object) — a job-like object describing the login request; it has the following properties:
    • endpoint (required, string) — an API endpoint for the login request; the same rules as for the Job endpoint apply here.
    • params (optional, object) — an object with key-value properties containing request parameters; object keys are parameters names; values are transformed the same way as in jobs.
    • method (optional, string) — an HTTP method to send the request; this defines how the parameters are sent to the API. The default value is GET.
    • headers (optional, object) — an object with key-value properties containing HTTP headers. The names will be used as HTTP header names, and the values will be used as the value of the respective header.
  • format (optional, string) — defines the expected format of loginRequest; the allowed values are json (default) and text. If the format is text, then it is converted to a json with field data (see example. This conversion will also be applied in case the response is a JSON scalar. But in that case, format json has to be used (see example [EX129]).
  • apiRequest (optional, object) — an object which defines how the result of the login request will be used in the actual API request; it contains the following properties:
    • headers (optional, object) — an object with key-value properties containing HTTP headers. The names are header names, the values are paths in the JSON response from which the actual values are extracted.
    • query (optional, object) — an object with key-value properties containing URL query parameters. The names are parameter names, and the values are paths in the JSON response from which the actual values are extracted.
  • expires (optional, mixed) — either an integer value specifying a fixed number of seconds after which the login request will be sent again (see an example); or, an object with the following properties:
    • response (required, string) — a path in the JSON response which contains the expiration time. It can be either:
      • a string which can be processed by the strtotime function (see an example), or
      • a numeric timestamp (with "relative": false), or
      • a number of seconds for which the credentials are valid (with "relative": true).
    • relative (optional, boolean) — When true, the expiration time is relative to the current time. The default value is false.

Note that the values in apiRequest.headers and apiRequest.query take precedence over the values specified in the api.http.defaultOptions.headers (see an example). If expires is not set, the login request is called only once before all other requests. To call the login request before every request (e.g., to obtain access token from refresh token), set "expires": 0.

Examples

Below are several examples showing you how to use various login authentication related features in Generic Extractor.

Configuration with Headers

Let’s say you have an API which requires every API call to be authorized with the X-ApiToken header. The value of that header (an API token) is obtained by calling the /login endpoint with the headers X-Login and X-Password. The /login endpoint response looks like this:

{
    "authorization": {
        "token": "a1b2c3d435f6"
    }
}

The following API configuration deals with the authentication:

"api": {
    "baseUrl": "http://example.com",
    "authentication": {
        "type": "login",
        "loginRequest": {
            "endpoint": "login",
            "method": "GET",
            "headers": {
                "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                "X-Password": "TopSecret"
            }
        },
        "apiRequest": {
            "headers": {
                "X-ApiToken": {
                    "response": "authorization.token"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The first request will be sent to /login with the HTTP headers:

X-Login: JohnDoe
X-Password: TopSecret

All consecutive requests will be sent to the endpoints specified in the jobs section and will contain the header:

X-ApiToken: a1b2c3d435f6

See example [EX079].

Configuration with Headers and Text Response

Let’s say you have an API like the above, but it returns the login response as a plain text:

a1b2c3d435f6

The following API configuration deals with the authentication:

"api": {
    "baseUrl": "http://example.com",
    "authentication": {
        "type": "login",
        "loginRequest": {
            "endpoint": "login",
            "method": "GET",
            "headers": {
                "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                "X-Password": "TopSecret"
            }
        },
        "format": "text",
        "apiRequest": {
            "headers": {
                "X-ApiToken": {
                    "response": "data"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

The first request will be sent to /login with the HTTP headers:

X-Login: JohnDoe
X-Password: TopSecret

The plain text response a1b2c3d435f6 is converted to the following JSON:

{
    "data": "a1b2c3d435f6"
}

Therefore you can access it in the headers configuration using the "response": "data" reference. All consecutive requests will be sent to the endpoints specified in the jobs section and will contain the header:

X-ApiToken: a1b2c3d435f6

See example [EX128].

Configuration with Query Parameters

Let’s say you have an API which requires an HTTP POST request with username and password to the endpoint /login/form. On a successful login, it returns the following response:

{
    "authentication": [
        { 	
            "secret": "a1b2c3d435f6"
        },
        {
            "token": {
                "id": 123
            }
        }
    ]
}

The actual API requests then must contain the secretKey and tokenId parameters in the URL. The following authentication configuration takes care of the situation:

"authentication": {
    "type": "login",
    "loginRequest": {
        "endpoint": "login/form",
        "method": "FORM",
        "params": {
            "username": "JohnDoe",
            "password": "TopSecret"
        }
    },
    "apiRequest": {
        "query": {
            "secretKey": {
                "response": "authentication.0.secret"
            },
            "tokenId": {
                "response": "authentication.1.token.id"
            }
        }
    }
}

The first API request will be sent as:

POST /login/form

username=JohnDoe&password=TopSecret

The FORM method sends the parameters as application/x-www-form-urlencoded. The apiRequest.query settings then map the response values to the parameters of the other API calls, so the second API call will be sent as:

GET /users?secretKey=a1b2c3d435f6&tokenId=123

See example [EX080].

Parameter Overriding

The above examples show how to use query parameters and headers separately. However, they can be mixed freely; they can also be mixed with parameters and headers entered elsewhere in the configuration. The following example shows how parameters from different places are merged together:

Click to expand the example.
{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "http": {
                "defaultOptions": {
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Mode": "development",
                        "X-Account-Id": 123
                    },
                    "params": {
                        "debug": "1",
                        "orderBy": "default",
                        "secretKey": "123"
                    }
                }
            },
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "login",
                    "method": "POST",
                    "params": {
                        "username": "JohnDoe",
                        "password": "TopSecret"
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "query": {
                        "apiToken": {
                            "response": "authorization.token"
                        },
                        "secretKey": {
                            "response": "authorization.secretKey"
                        },
                        "customerId": {
                            "response": "authorization.accountId"
                        }
                    },
                    "headers": {
                        "X-SecretKey": {
                            "response": "authorization.secretKey"
                        },
                        "X-Account-Id": {
                            "response": "authorization.accountId"
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        "config": {
            "debug": true,
            "outputBucket": "ge-tutorial",
            "jobs": [
                {
                    "endpoint": "users",
                    "params": {
                        "orderBy": "userName",
                        "secretKey": "none",
                        "customerId": "234"
                    }
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}


The example configuration sends its first request as:

POST /login

{"username":"JohnDoe","password":"TopSecret"}

with this header:

Content-Type: application/json

Notice that in the case of the login request both headers and params from api.defaultOptions are ignored. Only the headers and params from api.authentication.loginRequest are used (and encoded as JSON because of "method": "POST").

The second API call is sent as:

GET /users?debug=1&orderBy=userName&secretKey[0]=none&secretKey[1]=a1b2c3d435f6&customerId[0]=234&customerId[1]=abc&apiToken=987654

with this header:

X-Mode: development
X-Account-Id: abc
X-SecretKey: a1b2c3d435f6

The request URL contains the following query parameters:

  • debug=1 — coming from the api.http.defaultOptions.params option
  • orderBy=userName — coming from the config.jobs.params option, which overrides the value specified in api.http.defaultOptions.params
  • secretKey[0]=none — coming from the config.jobs.params option, which overrides the value specified in api.http.defaultOptions.params
  • secretKey[1]=a1b2c3d435f6 — coming from the api.authentication.apiRequest.query option
  • customerId[0]=234 — coming from the config.jobs.params option
  • customerId[1]=abc — coming from the api.authentication.apiRequest.query option
  • apiToken=987654 — coming from the api.authentication.apiRequest.query option

The request headers contain:

  • X-Mode — coming from the api.http.defaultOptions.headers option
  • X-Account-Id — coming from the api.authentication.apiRequest.headers option, which overrides the values specified in api.http.defaultOptions.headers
  • X-SecretKey — coming from the api.authentication.apiRequest.headers option

As you can see, the headers specified elsewhere are overwritten by the api.authentication.apiRequest while the parameters specified elsewhere are merged with the api.authentication.apiRequest.

See example [EX081].

Expiration Basic

It is possible that the credentials provided by the login request have a time-limited validity. This is handled by the expires option. If the obtained credentials are always valid for a certain period of time, for example for 1 hour, modify the first example to this:

{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "login",
                    "method": "GET",
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                        "X-Password": "TopSecret"
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "headers": {
                        "X-ApiToken": {
                            "response": "authorization.token"
                        }
                    }
                },
                "expires": "3600"
            }
        }
    }
}

This causes Generic Extractor to call the login request every hour.

See example [EX082].

Expiration from Response

In case the credentials provided by the login request have a time-limited validity, use the expires option. If the validity of the credentials is returned in the response, modify the first example to this:

{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "login",
                    "method": "GET",
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                        "X-Password": "TopSecret"
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "headers": {
                        "X-ApiToken": {
                            "response": "authorization.token"
                        }
                    }
                },
                "expires": {
                    "response": "authorization.expires"
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This assumes that the response of the login request looks like this:

{
    "authorization": {
        "token": "a1b2c3d435f6",
        "expires": "2017-02-20 12:34:45"
    }
}

See example [EX083].

Relative Expiration from Response

In case the API returns credentials validity in the login request and that validity is expressed in seconds, use the expires option together with setting relative to true. The result is the behavior of the first example but the value is taken from the response as in the second example.

{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "login",
                    "method": "GET",
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Login": "JohnDoe",
                        "X-Password": "TopSecret"
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "headers": {
                        "X-ApiToken": {
                            "response": "authorization.token"
                        }
                    }
                },
                "expires": {
                    "response": "authorization.expires",
                    "relative": true
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

This assumes that the response of the login request looks like this:

{
    "authorization": {
        "token": "a1b2c3d435f6",/
        "expires": 3600
    }
}

See example [EX084].

Login Authentication with Functions

Suppose you have an API which requires you to send a username and password separated by a colon and base64 encoded — for example, JohnDoe:TopSecret (base64 encoded to Sm9obkRvZTpUb3BTZWNyZXQ=) in the X-Authorization header to an /auth endpoint. The login endpoint then returns a token which can be used with other API calls.

The following configuration reads both the login and password parameters from the config section and uses the login authorization method to send them to the special /auth endpoint.

{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "auth",
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Authorization": {
                            "function": "base64_encode",
                            "args": [
                                {
                                    "function": "concat",
                                    "args": [
                                        {
                                            "attr": "#login"
                                        },
                                        ":",
                                        {
                                            "attr": "#password"
                                        }
                                    ]
                                }
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Api-Token": "token"
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        "config": {
            "#login": "JohnDoe",
            "#password": "TopSecret",
            "debug": true,
            "outputBucket": "mock-server",
            "jobs": [
                {
                    "endpoint": "users",
                    "dataType": "users"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

See example [EX100].

Login Authentication with Login and API Request

Suppose you have an API similar to the one in the previous example. It requires you to send a username and password separated by a colon and base64 encoded — for example, JohnDoe:TopSecret (base64 encoded to Sm9obkRvZTpUb3BTZWNyZXQ=) in the X-Authorization header to an /auth endpoint. The difference is that the login endpoint returns a token which must be further processed. The other API requests expects that the received token is concatenated again with the user name — for example, JohnDoe:d868d581b2f and an SHA1 hash is generated (e.g. 09e4e6977b72ecc9fa2120f49a4a74f5c268d277). This value must be sent as an auth query parameter.

The loginRequest part of the following configuration is the same as in the previous example — it reads both the login and password parameters from the config section and uses the login authorization method to send them to the special /auth endpoint. The apiRequest part of the configuration uses the sha1 function on the result of the concat function. The concat function takes the login parameter from the config section (via "attr": "#login" reference) and the token parameter from the response of the login request (via "response": "authorization.token" reference).

{
    "parameters": {
        "api": {
            "baseUrl": "http://example.com/",
            "authentication": {
                "type": "login",
                "loginRequest": {
                    "endpoint": "auth",
                    "headers": {
                        "X-Authorization": {
                            "function": "base64_encode",
                            "args": [
                                {
                                    "function": "concat",
                                    "args": [
                                        {
                                            "attr": "#login"
                                        },
                                        ":",
                                        {
                                            "attr": "#password"
                                        }
                                    ]
                                }
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                },
                "apiRequest": {
                    "query": {
                        "auth": {
                            "function": "sha1",
                            "args": [
                                {
                                    "function": "concat",
                                    "args": [
                                        {
                                            "attr": "#login"
                                        },
                                        ":",
                                        {
                                            "response": "authorization.token"
                                        }
                                    ]
                                }
                            ]
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        "config": {
            "#login": "JohnDoe",
            "#password": "TopSecret",
            "debug": true,
            "outputBucket": "mock-server",
            "jobs": [
                {
                    "endpoint": "users",
                    "dataType": "users"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

See example [EX117] or example [EX118], which uses headers.