Configuration File Specification

Configuration files are one of the possible channels for exchanging data between components and Keboola Connection (KBC).

To create a sample configuration file (together with the data directory), use the Debug API call via the Docker Runner API. You will get a zip archive containing all the resources you need in your component.

All configuration files are always stored in JSON format.

Configuration File Structure

Each configuration file has the following root nodes:

  • storage: Contains both the input and output mapping for both files and tables. This section is important if your component uses a dynamic input/output mapping. Simple components can be created with a static input/output mapping. They do not use this configuration section at all (see Tutorial).
  • parameters: Contains arbitrary parameters passed from the UI to the component. This section can be used in any way you wish. Your component should validate the contents of this section. For passing sensitive data, use encryption. This section is not available in Transformations.
  • image_parameters: See below.
  • authorization: Contains Oauth2 authorization contents.
  • action: Name of the action to execute; defaults to run. All actions except run have a strict execution time limit of 30 seconds. See actions for more details.

Validation

Your application should implement validation of the parameters section, which is passed without modification from the UI. Your application might also implement validation of the storage section if you have some specific requirements on the input mapping or output mapping setting (e.g., certain number of tables, certain names). If you chose to do any validation outside the parameters section, it must always be forward compatible – i.e. benevolent. While we maintain backward compatibility very carefully, it is possible for new keys to appear in the configuration structure as we introduce new features.

Image Parameters

The image_parameters section contains configuration options, which are the same for every configuration of a component. They cannot be modified by the end-user. This section is typically used for global component parameters (such as a token, URL, version of your API) which, for any reason, are not practical to be part of the component image itself. The image_parameters contents are configured in the component settings in JSON format in two text fields: Image Parameters and Stack Parameters.

Both JSONs are merged into the image_parameters of the configuration file. The Stack Parameters provide different values for different KBC Stacks. Values in Stack Parameters are merged with those in Image Parameters with Stack Parameters having a higher priority. Stack Parameters are indexed with Storage URL or the given region.

Given the following Image Parameters:

{
    "name": "my-app-name",
    "token": "default"
}

And the following Stack Parameters:

{
    "connection.keboola.com": {
        "url": "https://my-us-api/",
        "token": "abc"
    },
    "connection.eu-central-1.keboola.com": {
        "url": "https://my-eu-api/",
        "token": "def"
    }
}

The component will receive the following image_parameters in the configuration file when run in the EU region:

{
    "image_parameters": {
        "name": "my-app-name",
        "url": "https://my-eu-api/",
        "token": "def"
    }
}

The component will receive the following image_parameters in the configuration file when run in the US region:

{
    "image_parameters": {
        "name": "my-app-name",
        "url": "https://my-us-api/",
        "token": "abc"
    }
}

When working with the API, note that the Developer Portal API (specifically the Component Detail API call) shows separate stack_parameters and image_parameters, because the API is region agnostic.

However, when working with the Storage API (specifically the Component list API call), the stack_parameters and image_parameters values are already merged and only those designated for the current region are visible.

Encryption

Both Image Parameters and Stack Parameters support encrypted values. In practice, however, the encrypted values must always be stored in Stack Parameters, because ciphers are not transferable between regions (i.e. an encrypted value is only usable in the region in which it was encrypted).

As with configurations, the encrypted values must be prefixed with the hash sign #. However, unlike in KBC configurations, you have to encrypt values manually via the API – they will not be encrypted automatically when you store Stack Parameters! When using the encryption API, provide only the componentId parameter (using projectId or configId will make the cipher unusable). Also take care to use the correct API URL to obtain ciphers for each region you need.

State File

The state file is used to store the component state for the next run. It provides a two-way communication between KBC configuration state storage and the component. The state file only works if the API call references a stored configuration (config is used, not configData).

The location of the state file is:

  • /data/in/state.json loaded from a configuration state storage
  • /data/out/state.json saved to a configuration state storage

The component reads the input state file and writes any content to the output state file (valid JSON) that will be available to the next API call. A missing or an empty file will remove the state value. A state object is saved to configuration storage only when actually running the app (not in debug API calls. The state must be a valid JSON file. Encryption is applied to the state the same way it is applied to configurations, KBC::ProjectSecure:: ciphers are used.

State File Properties

Because the state is stored as part of a Component configuration, the value of the state object is somewhat limited (should not generally exceed 1MB). It should not be used to store large amounts of data.

Also, the end-user cannot easily access the data through the UI. The data can be, however, modified outside of the component itself using the Component configuration API calls.

Important: The state file is not thread-safe. If multiple instances of the same configuration are run simultaneously in the same project, the one writing data later wins. Use the state file more as an HTTP cookie than as a database. A typical use for the state file would be saving the last record loaded from some API to enable incremental loads.

Usage File

Unlike the state file, the usage file is one way only and has a pre-defined structure. The usage file is used to pass information from the component to Keboola Connection. Metrics stored are used to determine how much resources the job consumed and translate the usage to KBC credits; this is very useful when you need your customers to pay using your component or service.

The usage file is located at /data/out/usage.json. It should contain an array of objects keeping information about the consumed resources. The objects have to contain only two keys, metric and value, as in the example bellow:

[
    {
        "metric": "API calls",
        "value": 150
    }
]

This structure is processed and stored within a job, so it can be analyzed, processed and aggregated later.

To keep track of the consumed resources in the case of a component failure, it is recommended to write the usage file regularly during the component run, not only at the end.

Note: As the structure of the state file is pre-defined, the content of the usage file is strictly validated and a wrong format will cause a component failure.

Examples

To create an example configuration, use the Debug API call. You will get a stage_0.zip archive in your StorageFile uploads, which will contain the config.json file. You can also use these configuration structure to create an API request for actually running a component. If you want to manually pass configuration options in the API request, be sure to wrap it around in the configData node.

A sample configuration file might look like this:

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "in.c-main.test",
                    "destination": "source.csv",
                    "limit": 50,
                    "columns": [],
                    "where_values": [],
                    "where_operator": "eq"
                },
                {
                    "source": "pokus.snaz.test",
                    "destination": "source1.csv"
                }
            ],
            "files": []
        },
        "output": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "destination.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.test",
                    "incremental": false,
                    "colummns": [],
                    "primary_key": [],
                    "delete_where_values": [],
                    "delete_where_operator": "eq",
                    "delimiter": ",",
                    "enclosure": "\""
                },
                {
                    "source": "destination1.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.test2"
                }
            ],
            "files": []
        }
    },
    "parameters": {
        "multiplier": 2
    },
    "image_parameters": [],
    "action": "run"
}

Tables

Tables from the input mapping are mounted to /data/in/tables. Input mapping parameters are similar to the Storage API export table options . If destination is not set, the CSV file will have the same name as the table (without adding .csv suffix). The tables element in a configuration of the input mapping is an array and supports the following attributes:

  • source
  • destination
  • days (internally converted to changed_since)
  • columns
  • where_column
  • where_operator
  • where_values
  • limit

The output mapping parameters are similar to the Transformation API output mapping . destination is the only required parameter. If source is not set, the CSV file is expected to have the same name as the destination table. The tables element in a configuration of the output mapping is an array and supports the following attributes:

  • source
  • destination
  • incremental
  • columns
  • primary_key
  • delete_where_column
  • delete_where_operator
  • delete_where_values
  • delimiter
  • enclosure

Input Mapping — Basic

Download tables in.c-ex-salesforce.Leads and in.c-ex-salesforce.Accounts to /data/tables/in/leads.csv and /data/tables/in/accounts.csv.

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Leads",
                    "destination": "leads.csv"
                },
                {
                    "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Accounts",
                    "destination": "accounts.csv"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

In an API request, this would be passed as:

{
    "configData": {
        "storage": {
            "input": {
                "tables": [
                    {
                        "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Leads",
                        "destination": "leads.csv"
                    },
                    {
                        "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Accounts",
                        "destination": "accounts.csv"
                    }
                ]
            }
        }
    }
}

Input Mapping — Incremental Load

Download 2 days of data from the in.c-storage.StoredData table to /data/tables/in/in.c-storage.StoredData.

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "in.c-storage.StoredData",
                    "days": "2"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Input Mapping — Select Columns

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Leads",
                    "columns": ["Id", "Revenue", "Date", "Status"]
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Input Mapping — Filtered Table

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "in.c-ex-salesforce.Leads",
                    "destination": "closed_leads.csv",
                    "where_column": "Status",
                    "where_values": ["Closed Won", "Closed Lost"],
                    "where_operator": "eq"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Output Mapping — Basic

Upload /data/out/tables/out.c-main.data.csv to out.c-main.data.

{
    "storage": {
        "output": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "out.c-main.data.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.data"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Output Mapping — Headless CSV

Upload /data/out/tables/data.csv, a CSV file without headers on its first line, to the table out.c-main.data.

{
    "storage": {
        "output": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "data.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.data",
                    "columns": ["column1", "column2"]
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Output Mapping — Set Additional Properties

Incrementally upload /data/out/tables/data.csv to out.c-main.data with a compound primary key set on the columns column1 and column2.

{
    "storage": {
        "output": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "data.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.data",
                    "incremental": true,
                    "primary_key": ["column1", "column2"]
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Output Mapping — Delete Rows

Delete data from the destination table before uploading the CSV file (only makes sense with incremental: true).

{
    "storage": {
        "output": {
            "tables": [
                {
                    "source": "data.csv",
                    "destination": "out.c-main.Leads",
                    "incremental": true,
                    "delete_where_column": "Status",
                    "delete_where_values": ["Closed"],
                    "delete_where_operator": "eq"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Files

Another way of downloading files from file uploads is to use an Elasticsearch query or filtering with tags. Note that the results of a file mapping are limited to 10 files (to prevent accidental downloads). If you need more files, use multiple file mappings.

All files matching the search will be downloaded to the /data/in/files folder. The name of each file has the fileId_fileName format. Each file will also contain a manifest with all information about the file.

Input Mapping — Query

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "files": [
                {
                    "tags": ["docker-demo"],
                    "query": "name:.zip"
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

This will download with files with matching .zip and having the docker-demo tag. Depending on the contents of your File uploads in Storage, this may produce something like:

/data/in/files/75807542_fooBar.zip
/data/in/files/75807542_fooBar.zip.manifest
/data/in/files/75807657_fooBarBaz.zip
/data/in/files/75807657_fooBarBaz.zip.manifest

Input Mapping — Run ID

Use the filter_by_run_id option to select only the files which are related to the job currently being executed. If filter_by_run_id is specified, we will download only those files which satisfy the filter (either tags or query) and were uploaded by a parent job (a job with same or parent runId). This allows you to further limit downloaded files only to those related to a current chain of jobs.

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "files": [
                {
                    "tags": ["fooBar"],
                    "filter_by_run_id": true
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

This will download only files with the fooBar tag that were produced by a parent job to the currently running Docker.

Output Mapping — Basic

Define additional properties for uploaded files in the output mapping configuration. If that file is not present in the /data/out/files folder, an error will be thrown.

{
    "storage": {
        "output": {
            "files": [
                {
                    "source": "file.csv",
                    "tags": ["processed-file", "csv"]
                },
                {
                    "source": "image.jpg",
                    "is_public": true,
                    "is_permanent": true,
                    "tags": ["image", "pie-chart"]
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

Incremental Processing

Docker containers may be used to process unknown files incrementally. This means that when a container is run, it will download any files not yet downloaded and process them. To achieve this behavior, it is necessary to select only the files which have not been processed yet and tag the processed files. To achieve the former, use a proper Elasticsearch query. The latter is achieved using the processed_tags setting. The processed_tags setting is an array of tags which will be added to the input files once they are downloaded. A sample contents of configData:

{
    "storage": {
        "input": {
            "files": [
                {
                    "query": "tags: toprocess AND NOT tags: downloaded",
                    "processed_tags": ["downloaded"]
                }
            ]
        }
    }
}

The above request will download every file with the toprocess tag except for the files having the downloaded tag. It will mark each such file with the downloaded tag; therefore the query will exclude them on the next run. This allows you to set up an incremental file processing pipeline.